Images from our brief visit to a Buddhist temple in Guangzhou. Play audio clip below for a sampling of the Buddhist monks’ chants. 

Tags: guangzhou

Last week in Guangzhou, Mrs. Bousquet, Dr. Young, and I had a rare free morning and used it to explore a bit of the city. We went to Beijing Road, a pedestrian street, and stumbled upon a Buddhist temple. It was my first time experiencing anything like it and I was absolutely mesmerized.

Buddhist monks, dressed in the traditional orange robes, were chanting inside the temple - listen to the clip above. Photoset of the temple to follow. 

Click the link to view photos from each day of the trip including meetings with universities, alumni dinners, and more. Enjoy! 

Tags: photos

Above: Me with Brita Dallmann, a UW-Eau Claire graduate now living and teaching just English outside of Shanghai. 
On Thursday, I met up with recent UW-Eau Claire graduate Brita Dallmann, who graduated in May with a degree in Spanish and now teaches English in a Chinese middle school in Qingpu, China. We met up at Boxing Cat, an authentic American restaurant in Shanghai where I enjoyed a much-needed cheeseburger. Over dinner, we chatted about what brought Ms. Dallmann to China and her experience there thus far.
Ms. Dallmann works for a company called Pacican, which matches native English speakers with schools in the Shanghai area to teach middle schoolers English conversation and culture. Ms. Dallmann said she loves her job and hopes to renew her contract, which ends in June. Her favorite part? Her students. 
"My kids are my favorite part of every day," Ms. Dallmann said. "Just like any job, there are days where you wake up and don’t want to go. But when I go into the classroom, they’re so excited, so happy to see me." 
Ms. Dallmann said she loves living in China. After spending nine months in Spain studying abroad while at UW-Eau Claire, she’s realized China is very different from anything she’s experienced. 
"It’s a completely different part of the world, you can go to Europe and experience that and it’s great, but it’s still the Western world," Ms. Dallmann said. "You come here and it’s completely different. Different values, different people, just a different mindset." 

Above: Me with Brita Dallmann, a UW-Eau Claire graduate now living and teaching just English outside of Shanghai. 

On Thursday, I met up with recent UW-Eau Claire graduate Brita Dallmann, who graduated in May with a degree in Spanish and now teaches English in a Chinese middle school in Qingpu, China. We met up at Boxing Cat, an authentic American restaurant in Shanghai where I enjoyed a much-needed cheeseburger. Over dinner, we chatted about what brought Ms. Dallmann to China and her experience there thus far.

Ms. Dallmann works for a company called Pacican, which matches native English speakers with schools in the Shanghai area to teach middle schoolers English conversation and culture. Ms. Dallmann said she loves her job and hopes to renew her contract, which ends in June. Her favorite part? Her students. 

"My kids are my favorite part of every day," Ms. Dallmann said. "Just like any job, there are days where you wake up and don’t want to go. But when I go into the classroom, they’re so excited, so happy to see me." 

Ms. Dallmann said she loves living in China. After spending nine months in Spain studying abroad while at UW-Eau Claire, she’s realized China is very different from anything she’s experienced. 

"It’s a completely different part of the world, you can go to Europe and experience that and it’s great, but it’s still the Western world," Ms. Dallmann said. "You come here and it’s completely different. Different values, different people, just a different mindset." 

Meet Ms. Lizzie Xiao, who studied journalism at UW-Eau Claire from 2008-2009 and is now in graduate school for journalism at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China. Both being journalism majors who have studied at UW-Eau Claire, we had an instant connection. Ms. Xiao was a delight to talk with and had wonderful things to say about her Blugold experience.
"That year was the most marvelous and unforgettable year in my student life," Ms. Xiao said. "I like the people from the United States, they’re very friendly and open to us. I wasn’t homesick at all."
Ms. Xiao said she chose to get involved on campus and is glad she did. “I got involved very quickly,” Ms. Xiao said, “I did the 24-Hour Project, I was the only foreigner that year. I also liked the International Folk Fair, I did a fan dance with other traditional Chinese dancers.”
For Ms. Xiao, the biggest difference between the U.S. and China is the lifestyle. “It’s more relaxed in the U.S., the students have more choices. They have wide interests, just like me, so I really felt that I fit.” 
I asked Ms. Xiao why she chose to study journalism. Her answer is the exact same as my own: “The industry really fit my personality,” Ms. Xiao said. “I really love communicating with different people from various cultural backgrounds, and being a journalism major gave me that chance.” 

Meet Ms. Lizzie Xiao, who studied journalism at UW-Eau Claire from 2008-2009 and is now in graduate school for journalism at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China. Both being journalism majors who have studied at UW-Eau Claire, we had an instant connection. Ms. Xiao was a delight to talk with and had wonderful things to say about her Blugold experience.

"That year was the most marvelous and unforgettable year in my student life," Ms. Xiao said. "I like the people from the United States, they’re very friendly and open to us. I wasn’t homesick at all."

Ms. Xiao said she chose to get involved on campus and is glad she did. “I got involved very quickly,” Ms. Xiao said, “I did the 24-Hour Project, I was the only foreigner that year. I also liked the International Folk Fair, I did a fan dance with other traditional Chinese dancers.”

For Ms. Xiao, the biggest difference between the U.S. and China is the lifestyle. “It’s more relaxed in the U.S., the students have more choices. They have wide interests, just like me, so I really felt that I fit.” 

I asked Ms. Xiao why she chose to study journalism. Her answer is the exact same as my own: “The industry really fit my personality,” Ms. Xiao said. “I really love communicating with different people from various cultural backgrounds, and being a journalism major gave me that chance.” 

Dr. Tim Vaughan plays harmonica for the delegation and Jinan University hosts at dinner Monday night in Guangzhou, China. 

Dr. Tim Vaughan plays harmonica for the delegation and Jinan University hosts at dinner Monday night in Guangzhou, China. 

Tags: guangzhou

Dr. Tim Vaughan, interim dean of the College of Business, impressed both the delegation and our Jinan University hosts alike at dinner in Guangzhou on Monday night when he pulled out a harmonica and played for us all. He began with a traditional Chinese tune he’d picked up over his visits to China - this trip was his third - and ended his performance with a traditional Irish song. 

Dr. Vaughan said he’s been playing harmonica ever since his father gave him one for Christmas when he was 7 years old. 

"Now I keep one on me at all times," Dr. Vaughan said. "I always have at least one with me when I travel. Even on car trips; I’ll just pull out my harmonica and start playing." 

Play the clip to hear a segment of Dr. Vaughan’s traditional Chinese tune! 

A few scenes from our two days in Shanghai. 

Shanghai has been business-centric, with trips to the UW-Madison Shanghai Innovation Office (which opened in June and which Chancellor Bousquet was integral in creating), 3M China, Hormel and Schneider Trucking. The delegation really enjoyed the visit to 3M; our host, Mr. Kenneth Yu, was both knowledgeable and humorous. Our visit included a comprehensive presentation on the 3M company as well as a tour of simulations of many 3M products. 

I thought Mr. Yu said something particularly thought-provoking during his presentation: “Innovation doesn’t have to mean creating something brand new. It can mean improving something that already exists,” Mr. Yu said. 

In many ways, his quote sums up our delegation’s purpose in China - we aimed to strengthen our partnerships to create new possibilities for students and faculty in both China and at UW-Eau Claire.

Tags: shanghai

A few scenes from Wednesday taken in both Hangzhou and Shanghai. We are officially in Shanghai, the last leg of our trip. 

A few scenes from Monday and Tuesday, two fast-paced days full of meetings with universities, meals spent with our warm hosts, and yes, a tiny window of free time on Tuesday night. More content to follow later this week, including an interview with a fellow journalism student I met at Jinan University, a clip of Buddhist monks chanting at their temple, and even a clip of Dr. Vaughan playing his harmonica for the delegation and our hosts in Guangzhou.

Also stay tuned for more information about an open forum upon our return to the States. It will be open to faculty and students alike, and will be an open hour for the delegation to discuss the trip and answer questions about our partnerships and future plans with these universities here in China. More information to follow!